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Embedding Formative Assessment

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Embedding Formative Assessment

Workshop Overview:

 

There is now a large and growing evidence base that helping teachers develop their use of minute-to-minute and day-by-day assessment is one of, if not the most powerful ways to improve student learning. However, adopting formative assessment, or assessment for learning as it is sometimes called, involves far more than adding a few “quick fixes” to teachers' classroom repertoires. It involves a fundamental shift in focus, from what the teacher is putting in to the process to what the students are getting out of it.

 

In this 2-day workshop, participants will:

· be clear about formative assessment: what it is and what it isn't

· appreciate why many approaches to formative assessment have been unsuccessful 

· learn how the five “key strategies” of formative assessment provide a uniquely powerful framework for improving learning in classrooms 

· find out how the associated practical techniques allow formative assessment to be made a reality in any classroom 

· know the most powerful ways of supporting colleagues as they develop their formative assessment practice 

 

Formative assessment: what it is and what it isn't—when it works and when it doesn't

A number of studies have shown that helping teachers develop their use of formative assessment can have significant impact on the achievement of their students. However, these studies are today often cited in support of formative assessment practices that bear no relation to those that the research shows make a difference. In this session, participants will learn to distinguish between different kinds of formative assessments (including benchmark, interim, and common formative assessments) and, more importantly, know when to use which to make the most difference to student learning.

 

Eliciting evidence—the starting point for good feedback

Questioning, and a range of related techniques for eliciting evidence about student achievement, is a staple in classrooms all over the world, but in most classrooms, the greater part of the “intellectual heavy lifting” is performed by the teacher, with students delegated to a supporting role, or even, in many cases, “absent without leave.” In this session, participants will learn about a range of classroom techniques to improve questioning, including how to create, and capitalize upon, more “teachable moments” and the defining characteristics of effective diagnostic questions.

 

Providing feedback that moves learning forward

Feedback can have huge impact on learning, but most of the feedback received by students in schools is, at best, useless, and can, in many situations, actually lower student achievement. In this session, participants will learn about different kinds of feedback, the eight possible kinds of responses that students can make, and why only two of them will actually improve learning. As well as learning about a number of ready-to-use classroom techniques for providing effective feedback, participants will also learn how effective day-to-day feedback practices can be integrated into a classroom grading system that can be used both formatively and summatively.

 

Formative assessment—The learner's role

Although the teacher has a key role in the creation of effective learning environments, ultimately, learning is optimized only when students come to “own” their own learning. This session provides participants with a number of practical techniques for teachers to increase learner involvement in the direction, pace and structure of their own learning, including ways of sharing learning intentions and success criteria, peer assessment and self-assessment.

 

Supporting professional development with teacher learning communities

Teacher professional development has been a national priority in most developed countries for well over twenty years, and yet the results have been modest at best. Although the reasons for the failure of teacher professional development to increase student achievement are complex, the most significant factor appears to be that they have mis-diagnosed the problem. Teacher quality is assumed to be a matter of knowledge, and sessions of professional development have been focused on giving teachers they knowledge they are assumed to lack. Such sessions have been largely unsuccessful in increasing student achievement because the “problem” is not lack of knowledge—it is how to change practice. In this session, participants will learn about five key elements of effective professional development (choice, flexibility, incrementalism, accountability, and support), and how these can be enacted with building-based teacher learning communities.

 

 


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4,500
2024-08-09 08:00
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Non-refundable after 09/02/2024
Group Deal
4,050
2024-08-09 08:00
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Non-refundable after 09/02/2024
Early Bird
4,050
2024-06-20 08:00
Past Events
Valid till 20/06/2024, contact us if group buying

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Non-refundable after 09/02/2024

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Schedule
2024-08-24
2024-08-25
2024-08-24
08:00-15:30

8:00 --- 8:30 am Registration

8:30 --- 10:30 am  Session 1

10:30 --- 11:00 am  Break

11:00 --- 12:30 pm Session 2

12:30 --- 13:30 pm Lunch

13:30 --- 15:30 pm Session 3


2024-08-25
08:00-15:30


8:30 --- 10:30 am  Session 4

10:30 --- 11:00 am  Break

11:00 --- 12:30 pm Session 5

12:30 --- 13:30 pm Lunch

13:30 --- 15:30 pm Session 6


8:00 --- 8:30 am Registration

8:30 --- 10:30 am  Session 1

10:30 --- 11:00 am  Break

11:00 --- 12:30 pm Session 2

12:30 --- 13:30 pm Lunch

13:30 --- 15:30 pm Session 3



8:30 --- 10:30 am  Session 4

10:30 --- 11:00 am  Break

11:00 --- 12:30 pm Session 5

12:30 --- 13:30 pm Lunch

13:30 --- 15:30 pm Session 6


Organizer
Partner School

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Sponsors

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